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INDEX.

Actors, itinerant, I. 56.

| As You Like It, I. 330; when written,
ALLEYN, EDWARD, and his com 330; its sources, 331; the charac-
pany, I. 94.

ters, 335; rich and varied, 337;
All's Well that Ends Well, I. 373; | Orlando, 337; the Duke, 340 ;
when written, 373; its style, 377; Touchstone, 341; Jacques, 343;
its sources, 379; Helena, 384 ; | Rosalind, 344; the general drift
“Shakespeare's loveliest charac and temper of the play, 346 ; its
ter,” 389; the Countess, 392: improbabilities, 347; its geogra-
Bertram, 393; Parolles, 396; the phical license, 348; the whole

Poet's purpose in the play, 397.1 play replete with beauty, 349.
Antony and Cleopatra, when printed, BANDELLO borrows and improves

II. 388; when written, 388; 1 the story of Romeo and Juliet,
Knight and Verplanck's view of II. 203.
this question, 389; Malone and BEAUMONT, FRANCIS, refers to Shake-
Collier, 389; its historical sources, speare, I. 46.
390; the true history, 391 ; Oc- | BELLEFOREST, his French version of
tavius and Octavia, 394; the last Romeo and Juliet, II. 203.
of Shakespeare's plays to be Blackfriars play-house, I. 121.
appreciated, 395; its excellencies, Blank-verse, the oldest play extant
396; Coleridge's view of the play, in, I. 92; the second, 92.
397; its style, 396; its moral Brigham, Dr., on Shakespeare's
quality, 397; the magnificent in- cure for insanity, II. 371.
fatuation of the hero and heroine, BROOKE, ARTHUR: the earliest Eng.
399; Heraud's view of them, 399;} lish version of Romeo and Juliet
the author's personal relation to is his poem The Tragical History
the drama, 399; Enobarbus, 400; of Romeus and Juliet, II. 203.
Lepidus, 403; Octavius, 404; Oc- BUCHANAN, GEORGE: History of
tavia, 405; Cleopatra, Shake Scotland, 1582, II. 316.
speare's masterpiece in female BUCKNILL, Dr.: essay, The Psychol-
characterization, 407; Mark An ogy of Shakespeare, II. 365; on
tony, 412; Antony and Cleopatra, King Lear, 365; on the last

415; Charmian and Iras, 416. scenes of King Lear, 387.
ARDEN, Mary. See SHAKESPEARE, BURBADGE and company, I. 29.
Mary.

| CHARLES I., King, I. 48.
ARIOSTO, L.: The Supposes, trans- COLERIDGE, S. T., on Shakespeare's

lated by George Gascoigne, I. 92. Brutus, II. 244; view of Hamlet,

263; his own character, 264 ;| gloriously proud of his mother,
quoted, 265; on the Weird Sisters 509; her triumph, 510; Virgilia,
of Macbeth, 323 ; again quoted, 511; Volumnia, 512; imperson-
330; on Lady Macbeth, 340; on ates the woman's side of the
the Porter-scene in Macbeth, 348; Roman system, 513; Aufidius,
on the last scenes of King Lear, 517; Coleridge on him, 517.
387; estimation of Antony and Curtain, The, play-house, I. 121.
Cleopatra, 397; on Cassio in Cymbeline, II. 417; when written,

Iago, 489; on Aufidius, 517. 419; when acted, 419; its style
COLLIER, Mr., on the time of Julius and imagery, 419; when first

Cæsar's first appearance on the printed, 419; its structure, 420;
stage, II. 230.

its historical basis, 421; its sources,
Comedy and Tragedy, I. 84; their 422; a comedy or tragedy, 424;
beginnings, 85; Heywood's Inter how Hazlitt describes it, 424; its
ludes, 86; the earliest (1533), A anachronisms, 424; how Schlegel
Merry Play Between the Pardoner | regarded it, 425 ; a fine and varied
and the Friar, the Curate and display of poetry and character,
Neighbor Pratt, 86; an anony 425; the ground-work a tissue of
mous Interlude called Thersites counter-plottings, 426; one very
(1537), 87; the oldest known serious blemish, how it crept
regular English comedy, Ralph into the play, 427; the governing
Roister Doister (1551), 87; Miso- | thought, 428 ; Gervinus upon this
gonus (1560), 90; fifty-two dramas drama, 428.
performed at Court, 1568–1580, DOWDEN, Prof., of Dublin : note on
93; parts of Moral-Plays in com- Julius Cæsar, II. 240; view of
edy and tragedy, 93 ; A Knack Hamlet, 264.
to Know a Knave, 93.

DRAKE quoted on the drama of Mac-
CONOLLY, Dr., of England, view of beth, II. 349.

Hamlet's insanity, II. 272. | Drama, The English, I. 53; the
Contemporaries, Shakespeare's, 1.100.ancient, or Classic, 53; the modern,
Coriolanus, II. 490; when printed, Romantic, or Gothic, 53; origin of

490; the text, 490; when written, the latter in England, 54; three
491; its style and rank, 491; its forms of the English drama: the
historical source, 492; the Corio Miracle Plays, 55; the Moral
lanus of Plutarch, 492; the Poet Plays, 71; and Comedy and Tra-
borrows the words and sentences gedy ; before Shakespeare, 84, 97,
of the translator, 493; adheres to 122; Whetstone, George, on its
the main outlines of Plutarch's general state, 97; Gosson, Stephen,
Coriolanus, 497; the practical on, 97; Sidney, Sir Phillip, on, 98;
wisdom of the play, 499; Hazlitt's its rapid progress under the hand
charge, 499; the Patrician, 499; of Shakespeare, 124; in Shake-
the People, 500; the Hero, 501 ; his speare's time, II. 295.
pride, 502; rendered inflammable DRAYTON, MICHAEL, Mortimeriados
and uncontrollable by passion, or The Barons' Wars, II. 230.
503 ; his dissimulation, 505; his Dryden, Joun, on Shakespeare, I.
better traits, 507; his modesty, 508; 123.

English Language, The, at the time | Goethe on the moral scope and
of Shakespeare, I. 125.

I significance of Hamlet, II. 312.
Falstaff, Sir John, II. 83; the dra- | Gosson, STEPHEN, on the drama,
matic necessity for his character, I. 97.
83; his character, 84; his good GREENE, ROBERT, I. 30, 104; his
sense, 84; his wit, 84; his re- character, 104; his prose writings,
sources, 85; his tactics, 88; his 104; The History of Orlando
power over others, 89; what in Furioso (1591), 105; Alphonsus,
him attracts the Prince, 90; pur King of Arragon, 105; The Scoi-
pose of the first scene with the tish History of King James, 106;
Chief Justice, 91; Falstaff's hu- | Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
mour, 92; attracts others, 92;1 (1591), 107; George a Greene, the
Falstaff's sagacity, 93; not a Pinner of Wakefield (1599), 108;
coward, 94; has no sense of hon- A Looking-Glass for London and
our, 94; the greatest triumph of England, 109.
the comic Muse, 95; his practical Hall, John and Susanna, I. 49.
wisdom, 95; no moral feelings, 96; HALLAM, HENRY, view of Juliet,
strikes us as acting a part, 97; his II. 219; estimation of the drama
company not harmless to others, of Macbeth, 349.
98; his character grows worse to HALLIWELL, J. O., Shakespeare's
the end of the play, 98; broadly biographer, I. 8.
representative, 99.

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, II. 258;
FLEAY, Mr. F. G., on the authorship when first printed, 258 ; the first

of King Henry the Eighth, II.177; | issue, 258; when first written,
on Julius Cæsar, 228.

259; source of the plot, 259 ;
FLETCHER, John, joint-author with sketch of the history, 260; an

Shakespeare of King Henry the episode in the tale, 261; an an-
Eighth, II. 176; passage quoted | achronism, 261; the Hamlet of
from his The Knight of Malta, 182; 1604, 261; the play “a tragedy
. from his The False One, 183; from of thought," 262; its resemblance

The Lover's Progress, 185; his dic to Classic Tragedy, 262; the
tion and metre, 186.

character of Hamlet, 262; Cole-
FORMAN, Simon, M.D., first mentions ridge's view of him, 263; Prof.

Macbeth, II. 314; his The Book | Dowden of Dublin, his view of

of Plays and Notes thereof, 314. him, 264; other critics, 264; the au-
FROUDE, JAMES ANTHONY, on the thor's study of Hamlet, 265; Prof.
drama, I. 122 note.

Werder's essay on Hamlet, 266 ;
FULLER, Dr. Thomas, tribute to main fault of the critics, 267; the
Shakespeare, I. 46.

principal personages of the play,
GASCOIGNE, GEORGE, translator: The 267; Claudius, 268 ; the Queen,
Supposes of Ariosto, I. 92.

269; the Ghost, 269; Hamlet
GERVINUS upon Cymbeline, II. 428 ; really mad, 269; the reasons for

the King, 431; the Queen, 432; this judgment, 270; experts in
Cloten, 433; Iachimo, 436; Pisa mental disease regard his mad-
nio, 439; Posthumus, 441; Imogen, ness as real, 271; critics unwill-
446 ; Belarius and the Princes, ing to admit it, 272; Shake-

speare skilled in mental science,

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273; Hamlet's own view of his in- and Neighbor Pratt, 86; A merry
sanity, 274 ; Shakespeare's mind | Play between John the Husband,
charmed with certain forms of Tib the Wife, and Sir John the
mental disease, 274; the Poet's Priest, 87; The Four Ps, 87; The
method, 275; Hamlet's madness, Play of the Weather, 87.
275; the task imposed upon him Hickson, Mr. SAMUEL, on the
276; the change in him, 276; he authorship of King Henry the
is not master of his situation, 277;| Eighth, II. 176.
its difficulties, 278; Hamlet's Historical Plays, II. 5.
strength of will, 279; the conflict | HOLINSHED's Chronicles (1577), II.
between his feelings and his judg. 316.
ment, 280; the nature of his task, Hudson's, Mr., study of Hamlet, II.
280; his regard for his own rep. 265.
utation, 281 ; his hands tied, 282; JAMES I., King, I. 47.
the cause of his delay, 262; JAMESON, Mrs., view of Juliet, II.
reasons for Hamlet's course, 283; 219; of Cordelia, 375.
he doubts the honesty of the Johnson, Dr., on the play of Mac:
Ghost, 284 ; catching the King's beth II. 346; estimation of
conscience, 285; how the revenge Othello, 459.
is brought about, 287; Hamlet's JONSON, BEN., tribute to Shake.
self-disparagement, 288; his char- speare, I. 48; his Masque of
acter, 290; pathos of his situa- Queens, II. 322 ; quoted, 373.
tion, 291 ; his sensitive rectitude, Julius Cæsar, II. 228 ; when first
292; the substituted commission, printed, 228; Mr. Fleay's view of
293; Prof. Werder again, 293; | the play, 228; whether abridged
general remarks on Hamlet, 295 ; | by Ben Jonson, 228; other plays
Laertes, 295; the King, 297; the on the subject, 229; when written,
Ghost, 297; Horatio, 298; Polon- 229; Mr. Collier's view, 230; the
ius, 299: Ophelia, 302; the Queen, style of the drama, 231 ; histori-
310; scenic excellencies of the cal sources, 233; its Plutarchian
play, 311 ; combines the greatest matter, form, and order, 233; the
strength and diversity of powers, name of the play, 234 ; Brutus
311 ; Goethe on its moral scope its hero, but Cæsar its ruling
and significance, 312.

spirit, 234; the Cæsar of Shake-
Hathaway, Anne. See SHAKE speare, 234; the policy of the
SPEARE, Mrs. Anne.

drama, 237; Cæsar as known and
Hazlitt, describes Cymbeline, II. as rendered by Shakespeare, 238;
424; on Coriolanus, 409.

how Brutus regards him, 239;
HENSLOWE's Diary, I. 120; drama how Cassius regards him, 239;

tists and titles of pieces recorded the Cæsar of history, 241; Meri-
by him, 120.

vale's view of him, 244; Leonard
HERAUD's Inner Life of Shakespeare, Schmitz's view of him, 244; the

II. 399; on Antony and Cleo Brutus of Shakespeare, 245; the
patra, 399.

Brutus of history, 250; Meri-
HEYWOOD, John, his Interludes, I. | vale's view of him, 251; Brutus

86; A merry Play between the Par and Cassius, 251; Cassius, 252;
doner and the Friar, the Curate Portia, 253; Plutarch's touching

incident respecting her, 254 ;| frank and child-like playfulness,
Mark Antony, 255; the multi 125; he craves to be a man among
tude, 256; the rank of the play, his soldiers, 126; his frolicsome
257; Dr. Johnson's estimation of humour, 128; his piety, 129; his
it, 257; the scene of Brutus and civil administration, 131; dra-
his boy Lucius, 249, 257.

matic interest of the play, 132;
KELLOGG, Dr. A. O., of Utica: view the French caricatured, 133.

of Hamlet's insanity, II. 272; on King Henry the Eighth, II. 170;
Shakespeare's cure of insanity, | history of the play, 170; when
371.

written, 171; its design, 173;
KEMPE's applauded merriments, historic basis of the action, 174;
I. 94.

its authorship, 175; the joint
King Henry the Fourth, II. 63; the production of Shakespeare and
two Parts substantially one drama, John Fletcher, 176; parts written
63; when written, 63; Sir John Old by the former, 177; by the latter,
Castle, 63; sources of the play, 65; 177; Mr. James Spedding's essay,
the true history, 65; the historical 176; Mr. Samuel Hickson's views,
characters, 68; Prince Henry, 68; 1 176; Mr. F. G. Fleay, 177; ex-
Bolingbroke, or the King, 69; tract from Spedding, 178; diction
Hotspur, 72; Glendower, 75; Lord and metre of the play, 181; the
Bardolph, 77; Vernon, 77; the structure of the play, 186 ; Sped-
Archbishop, 77; the Chief Justice, ding on its structure, 187; how
77; Northumberland, 78; Prince the authors stand committed to
Henry, the Poet's favourite, 78; the Reformation, 188; the social
his conduct and character, 79; at| and civil climate of England, as
the battle of Shrewsbury, 80; the shown in this play, 189; changes
Prince's beautiful character, 81; in ideas and manners, 190; the
the change in the Prince's charac King, 191; Buckingham, 192;
ter, 82; Falstaff, 83; Mrs. Quickly, Queen Catherine, 192; Cardinal
99; Shallow and Silence, 101; Wolsey, 193; Catherine again,
this drama one of the Poet's best, 196; the King again, 199; Anne
104.

Boleyn, 201 ; the moral effect of
King Henry the Fifth, II. 105; when the play, 202.

issued, 106; the whole re-written, King John, II. 8; inferior as a his-
108; its sources, 108; the true tory, 8; when written, 9; its
history, 108; Falstaff, 111; Fal sources, 10; it follows a fabulous
staff's companions, 113; the Boy, history, 13; what is the true his-
114; Fluellen, Jamy, and Mac- tory, 13; Prince Arthur, 17; Leo-
morris, 115; the King, 117; the pold of Austria, 18; the people of
most complex and many-sided of Angiers, 19; the Pope, 19; the
all Shakespeare's heroes, except, politics of the piece, 21; its degree
perhaps, Hamlet, 117; the native of excellence, 21 ; King John, 23;
harmony and beauty of his char- the King's title, 26; Constance,
acter, 118; may almost be said to 27; Arthur, 29; Falcon bridge, 31.
consist of piety, honesty, and King Lear, II. 349; when acted,
modesty, 122; a discreet and 349; when written, 350 ; when
prudent general, 125; his old! printed, 350; the story and its

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