Shakspeare's Seven Ages of Man: Or, The Progress of Human Life. Illustrated by Prose and Verse, from the Works of the Most Eminent Writers. With a Brief Memoir of Shakspeare and His Writings

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Chiswick Press, 1834 - 252 páginas
 

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Página 28 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Página 165 - Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor...
Página 7 - Invest me in my motley ; give me leave To speak my mind, and I will through and through Cleanse the foul body of the infected world, If they will patiently receive my medicine.
Página 116 - Who can find a virtuous woman ? for her price is far above rubies. ' The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil. ' She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life.
Página 98 - When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew : fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers ; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild...
Página 207 - Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age, like as a shock of corn cometh in in his season.
Página 155 - The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice
Página 8 - All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players : They have their exits and their entrances ; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Página 4 - To-day, my lord of Amiens and myself Did steal behind him, as he lay along Under an oak whose antique root peeps out Upon the brook that brawls along this wood : To the which place a poor sequester'd stag, That from the hunter's aim had ta'en a hurt...
Página 126 - By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks ; So he, that doth redeem her thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities : But out upon this half-faced fellowship ! Wor.

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