Individualism and the Social Order: The Social Element in Liberal Thought

Portada
Liberalism is typically misconceived as a philosophy of individualism, which cannot accept that man exists in society and that man's values are shaped by that society.

This book attempts to identify the role of community and society in the political and social thought of leading liberal social philosophers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries including John Stuart Mill, Herbert Spencer and Friedrich A. von Hayek. While differing as to the nature of man and society, each thinker examined holds the basic premise that man is not an isolated creature whole life is "nasty, brutish and short" but rather that his motivations are dependent upon his place in a social order.

Charles R. McCann has produced an interesting work that mixes communitarianism and economics and will surprise and intrigue in equal measure. Students and academics involved in the history of economic thought, philosophy and libertarianism will find this book to be a useful addition to their reading list.
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

Acknowledgments xiii
1
Liberalism as foil
7
Conservatism
19
Cooperation and conflict in community
31
Mill and libertarian liberalism
37
Stephen and conservative liberalism
71
Spencer and the evolution of moral society
95
5
128
6
154
Hayek and the form of the liberal community
180
Conclusion
213
Index
226
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (2004)

Charles R. McCann is Research Associate at the University of Pittsburgh. He has produced an interesting work that mixes communitarianism and economics and will surprise and intrigue in equal measure. Students and academics involved in the history of economic thought, philosophy and libertarianism will find this book to be a useful addition to their reading list.

Información bibliográfica