The Life of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volumen1

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T. C. Newby, 1847 - 372 páginas

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Página 32 - ... by indulging some peculiar habits of thought, was eminently delighted with those flights of imagination which pass the bounds of nature, and to which the mind is reconciled only by a passive acquiescence in popular traditions. He loved fairies, genii, giants, and monsters ; he delighted to rove through the meanders of enchantment, to gaze on the magnificence of golden palaces, to repose by the water-falls of Elysian gardens.
Página 332 - Yet now despair itself is mild, Even as the winds and waters are; I could lie down like a tired child, And weep away the life of care Which I have borne and yet must bear...
Página 231 - Were all that was, — only . . . when his regard Was raised by intense pensiveness, . . . two eyes. Two starry eyes, hung in the gloom of thought, And seemed with their serene and azure smiles To beckon him.
Página 43 - I will be wise, And just, and free, and mild, if in me lies Such power, for I grow weary to behold The selfish and the strong still tyrannize Without reproach or check.
Página 17 - May-dawn it was, When I walked forth upon the glittering grass, And wept, I knew not why: until there rose From the near school-room, voices, that, alas! Were but one echo from a world of woes — The harsh and grating strife of tyrants and of foes.
Página 142 - I am expelled," he said, as soon as he had recovered himself a little, " I am expelled ! I was sent for suddenly a few minutes ago ; I went to the common room, where I found our master, and two or three of the fellows. The master produced a copy of the little syllabus, and asked me if I were the author of it. He spoke in a rude, abrupt, and insolent tone. I begged to be informed for what purpose he put the question.
Página 276 - With beating heart and streaming eyes, even now I call the phantoms of a thousand hours Each from his voiceless grave : they have in...
Página 338 - That man could be so perfectionised as to be able to expel evil from his own nature, and from the greater part of the creation, was the cardinal point of his system.
Página 204 - I cannot but consider as highly immoral, has been established in proof, and established as the effect of those principles; conduct nevertheless which he represents to himself and others, not as conduct to be considered as immoral, but to be recommended and observed in practice, and as worthy of approbation.
Página 68 - WHOSE is the love that, gleaming through the world, Wards off the poisonous arrow of its scorn ? Whose is the warm and partial praise Virtue's most sweet reward ? Beneath whose looks did my reviving soul Riper in truth and virtuous daring grow ? Whose eyes have I gazed fondly on, And loved mankind the more? Harriet ! on thine :— thou wert my purer mind ; Thou wert the inspiration of my song ; Thine are these early wilding flowers, Though garlanded by me.

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