Shakespeare's Comedy of the Merchant of Venice

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W. Winter, 1881 - 86 páginas
 

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Página 70 - Tarry a little ; there is something else. This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood ; The words expressly are ' a pound of flesh : ' Take then thy bond, take thou thy pound of flesh ; But, in the cutting it, if thou dost shed One drop of Christian blood, thy lands and goods Are, by the laws of Venice, confiscate Unto the state of Venice.
Página 66 - And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much To mitigate the justice of thy plea; Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there. SHY. My deeds upon my head! I crave the law, The...
Página 55 - Hath not a Jew eyes ? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions ? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is ? If you prick us, do we not bleed ? if you tickle us, do we not laugh ? if you poison us, do we not die ? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge 1 if we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that.
Página 11 - Sleep, when he wakes ? and creep into the jaundice By being peevish ? I tell thee what, Antonio, I love thee, and it is my love that speaks ; There are a sort of men, whose visages Do cream and mantle, like a standing pond ; And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dressed in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit ; As who should say, " I am Sir Oracle ; And, when I ope my lips, let no dog bark...
Página 65 - It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes : 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest ; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown ; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings ; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
Página 61 - tis mine, and I will have it : If you deny me, fie upon your law ! There is no force in the decrees of Venice : I stand for judgment : answer ; shall I have it ? Duke.
Página 45 - I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace ; Or seek for rule, supremacy and sway, When they are bound to serve, love and obey.
Página 55 - The villainy you teach me, I will execute ; and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.
Página 22 - Mark you this, Bassanio, The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. An evil soul, producing holy witness, Is like a villain with a smiling cheek ; A goodly apple rotten at the heart ; Oh, what a goodly outside falsehood hath ! Shy.
Página 65 - Tis mightiest in the mightiest : it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown ; His scepter shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptered sway ; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself ; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.

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