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Samuel Bickerstaff, esqr. is so happy, as that by several legacies from distant relations, deaths of maiden sisters, and other instances of good fortune, he has, besides his real estate, a great sum of ready money. His son at the same time knows he has a good fortune, which the father cannot alienate, though he strives to make him believe he depends only on his will for maintenance. Tom is now in his nineteenth year, Mrs. Mary in her fifteenth. Cousin Samuel, who understands no one point of good behaviour, as it regards all the rest of the world, is an exact critic in the dress, the motion, the looks and gestures of his children.

What adds to their misery, is, that he is excessively fond of them, and the greatest part of their time is spent in the presence of this nice observer. Their life continued constraint. The girl never turns her head, but she is warned not to follow the proud minxes of the town. The boy is not to turn fop, or be quarrelsome; at the same time not to take an affront. I had the good fortune to dine with him to-day, and heard his fatherly table-talk as we sat at dinner, which, if my memory does not fail me, for the benefit of the world, I shall set down as he spoke it, which was much as follows, and may be of great use to those parents who seem to make it a rule that their children's turn to enjoy the world is not to commence, till they themselves have

left it.

“Now, Tom, I have bought you chambers in the “inns of court. I allow you to take a walk once or “ twice a day round the garden. If you mind your “business, you need not study to be as great a law“yer as Coke upon Littleton. I have that that will “keep you; but be sure you keep an exact account of “ your linen. Write down what you give out to your “laundress, and what she brings home again. Go as “little as possible to the other end of the town; but “if you do, come home early. I believe I was as sharp

“ as you for your ears, and I had my hat snatched off “ my head coming home late at a stop at St. Cle“ ment's Church, and I do not know from that day to “ this who took it. I do not care if you learn to fence a “ little, for I would not have you be made a fool of. “ Let me have an account of every thing every post; “I am willing to be at that charge, and I think you “ need not spare your pains. As for you, daughter “ Molly do not mind one word that is said to you in * London, for it is only for your money.”

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o TO THE THIRD VOLUME.
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\ PAGEs
* ABSURDITY, its importunity and folly 297
Absurdity resembles impudence ibid.
| Advertisement, of a play, called, Love for Love, to be acted
- for Mr. Dogget's benefit 37
f : . . . . . . . . Of Pasquin and Marfario 84
. . . . . . . . . Of the Silent Woman, for the benefit of
Mr. Eastcourt 85
- - - - - - - - - To the lady who chose Mr. Bickerstaff for
\, her valentime 117
. . . . . . . . . . Concerning the whetters near the Royal
Exchange 121
. . . . . . . . . About New Bedlam ibid.
- - - - - . . . . To all such as delight in soft lines 142
. . . . . . . . . To some midnight rakes 143
. . . . . . . . . About ladies wrought shoes and slippers 144
- - - - - - - ... To his correspondent in Scotland 148
. . . . . . . From a well-behaved young gentleman in
Cornhill 152
- - - - - - - - - . Of the sale of a Bass-Viol, by way of lot-
tery 253
*... . . . . . . . . Of walking pictures, sold by auction 254
". . . . . . . . . To Philander, upon his letter to Clarinda 272
- - - - - - - - - Of a Stage-coach and dancing shoes 318
- - - - - - - - - Concerning two letters sent to Mr. Bicker-
staff 343

Aeneas, his descent into the empire of death 192
PAGEs
Aeneas, his adventures there 192
Aesop, a fable of his, applied upon the receipt of aletter sent
to Mr. Bickerstaff
Afflictions, imaginary, often prove the most insupportable 154
Agamemnon, his invective against the female sex 183
Age, the glory of the present age, in relation to England 81
Album Græcum prescribed to a sick dog 41
Allegories profitable to the mind, in the same manner as hunt-
ing to the body 158
. . . . . . Application of an allegorical fable out of Homer ibid.
Ambition, what age on man most addicted to it 32
. . . . . . In the good it becomes true honour ibid.
. . . . . . The effects of it 340
. . . . . . The foundation of it 341
Anticyra, an island, assigned by the Romans as an habita-
tion for mad-mem 60
- - - - - - The product of it ibid.
. . . . . . Compared to Montpellier ibid.
Antiochus, in love with his mother-in-law 338
Apology for great men in the conferring of their favours 260
Aristacus, his great mastery over himself 296
Arthur, (King) the first thatever sat down to a wholeroast-
ed ox : 162
Athenians, an instance of the public spirit, and virtue of that
people - -
Avarice, what age of man most devoted to it 32
. . . . . Its region described 50
. . . . . Its temple, attendants and officers ibid.
. . . . . . An effect of the author's discourse upon it 58
Audience, what ought to be the behaviour of an audience at
the representation of a play 44
Autumn (Lady) her behaviour at church 130
B
Bagpipe, to what persons applied in conversation 189
- - - - - A club of bagpipes - 190
Bacon (Sir Francis) his legacy 97
Balance, a merchant, his treatment of a young lawyer that
endeavoured to debauch his wife 109
Barbarity, an attendant on tyranny 23
Barnes (Joshua) his new edition of Homer 144
Bass-Viol, the part it bears in conversation 188
- - - - - - Where most likely to be found 190
- - - - - - With what other instrument to be matched 212
- - - - - - Exposed to sale by way of lottery 253

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I}aubles, by whom brought first to perfection 137

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