The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth: With a Memoir, Volumen4

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Little, Brown and Company, 1865
 

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Página 231 - Nor less I deem that there are Powers Which of themselves our minds impress; That we can feed this mind of ours In a wise passiveness.
Página 256 - Blessings be with them — and eternal praise, Who gave us nobler loves, and nobler cares—- The Poets, who on earth have made us heirs Of truth and pure delight by heavenly lays ! Oh ! might my name be numbered among theirs, Then gladly would I end my mortal days.
Página 4 - It destroys likewise magnanimity, and the raising of human nature: for take an example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on, when he finds himself maintained by a man; who to him is instead of a God, or melior natura...
Página 229 - MOST sweet it is with unuplifted eyes To pace the ground, if path be there or none, While a fair region round the traveller lies Which he forbears again to look upon ; Pleased rather with some soft ideal scene, The work of Fancy, or some happy tone Of meditation, slipping in between The beauty coming and the beauty gone.
Página 3 - Action is transitory — a step, a blow, The motion of a muscle — this way or that — 'Tis done; and in the after-vacancy We wonder at ourselves like men betrayed: Suffering is permanent, obscure and dark, And has the nature of infinity.
Página 266 - STERN Daughter of the voice of God ! O Duty ! if that name thou love Who art a light to guide, a rod To check the erring, and reprove...
Página 319 - So fair, so sweet, withal so sensitive, Would that the little Flowers were born to live, Conscious of half the pleasure which they give ; That to this mountain-daisy's self were known The beauty of its star-shaped shadow, thrown On the smooth surface of this naked stone...
Página 270 - Who, if he rise to station of command, Rises by open means; and there will stand On honourable terms, or else retire, And in himself possess his own desire: Who comprehends his trust, and to the same, Keeps faithful with a singleness of aim ; And therefore does not stoop, nor lie in wait For wealth, or honours, or for worldly state ; Whom they must follow: on whose head must fall, Like showers of manna, if they come at all...
Página 250 - With rod and line I sued the sport Which that sweet season gave, 30 And, coming to the church, stopped short Beside my daughter's grave. ' Nine summers had she scarcely seen, The pride of all the vale ; And then she sang — she would have been A very nightingale. ' Six feet in earth my Emma lay ; And yet I loved her more — For so it seemed — than till that day I e'er had loved before.
Página 240 - And you must kindly take it : It is no tale ; but, should you think, Perhaps a tale you'll make it.

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