Address to the British Medical Association Delivered in the Hall of Christ Church, August 4, 1868

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T. Combe, 1868 - 50 páginas
 

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Página 44 - And all depends on keeping the eye steadily fixed upon the facts of nature and so receiving their images simply as they are. For God forbid that we should give out a dream of our own imagination for a pattern of the world...
Página 17 - Whereas the main Business of natural Philosophy is to argue from Phenomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects, till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these and such like Questions.
Página 36 - That the sins of the fathers are visited upon the children, to the third and fourth generation.
Página 45 - At least there is a tolerably general agreement about what an University is not. It is not a place of professional education. Universities are not intended to teach the knowledge required to fit men for some special mode of gaining their livelihood. Their object is not to make skilful lawyers, or physicians, or engineers, but capable and cultivated human beings.
Página 36 - ... can work his earthly work, whether it be the work which he shares in common with the beasts of the field, or the work through which he can enter into conscious relation to his unapproachable Creator ; the frame by which, while bound down in an earthly charnel-house, he lifts his eyes and strains his heart with yearning ineffable towards a higher nature, and obeys the upward-tending impulses of affections strong unto death, affections so pure and so divine as to lose in the love of others even...
Página 45 - University, is not professional knowledge, but that which should direct the use of their professional knowledge, and bring the light of general culture to illuminate the technicalities of a special pursuit.
Página 37 - On which Joseph Henry Green, who quotes the passage, says: 'I anticipate no objection when I state that the process for attaining or approximating to this great moral result constitutes in its scope or end a liberal education.' What that is, and how to be attained, is held by all thinking men to be one of the problems which our age has to solve, in and for the interests of our country. May not grave mistake arise herein? At all events, in the present transitional condition of this and other questions...
Página 45 - The proper function of an University in national education is tolerably well understood. At least there is a tolerably general agreement about what an University is not. It is not a place of professional education. Universities^ are not intended to teach the knowledge required to fit men for some special mode of gaining their livelihood. Their object is not to make skilful lawyers, or physicians...
Página 18 - ... the generalisation at once so simple, so overwhelming, that all action of which we are immediately cognisant is but the result of the operation of solar heat upon and through interdependent and correlative existences ; that all things in this system are capable only of interchange ; that there is no destruction of what exists ; no creation of nc\v energy.
Página 45 - ... Job, and other parts of the sacred writings ; seeking for the dead among the living : which also makes the inhibition and repression of it the more important, because from this unwholesome mixture of things human and divine there arises not only a fantastic philosophy but also an heretical religion. Very meet it is therefore that we be sober-minded, and give to faith that only which is faith's.

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