Edinburgh Dramatic Review, Volúmenes1-2

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James L. Huie., 1822
 

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Página 160 - With his surcease success : that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come. But in these cases We still have judgment here ; that we but teach Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return To plague the inventor ; this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips.
Página 136 - Shakespear's genius here took its full swing, and trod upon the farthest bounds of nature and passion. This circumstance will account for the abruptness and violent antitheses of the style, the throes and labour which run through the expression, and from defects will turn them into beauties. " So fair and foul a day I have not seen," &c. " Such welcome and unwelcome news together." " Men's lives are like the flowers in their caps, dying or ere they sicken." " Look like the innocent flower, but be...
Página 93 - Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar : When Ajax strives some rock's vast- weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow ; Not so, when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.
Página 177 - Of this tragedy many particular passages deserve regard, and the contention and reconcilement of Brutus and Cassius is universally celebrated ; but I have never been strongly agitated in perusing it...
Página 137 - To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, To smooth the ice, or add another hue Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish, Is wasteful, and ridiculous excess.
Página 135 - ... life and death. The action is desperate and the reaction is dreadful. It is a huddling together of fierce extremes, a war of opposite natures which of them shall destroy the other. There is nothing but what has a violent end or violent beginnings.
Página 107 - ... he goes out in, is not more inadequate to represent the horrors of the real elements, than any actor can be to represent Lear...
Página 29 - Tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print; A book's a book, although there's nothing in't.
Página 135 - Macbeth and Lear, Othello and Hamlet, are usually reckoned Shakespeare's four principal tragedies. Lear stands first for the profound intensity of the passion ; Macbeth for the wildness of the imagination and the rapidity of the action ; Othello for the progressive interest and powerful alternations of feeling ; Hamlet for the refined development of thought and sentiment.

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