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all truth. He loves it with infinite and unchanging love; and He uniformly, and by necessity of his nature, acts according to it. To obey the truth, to do what is right, to do what accords with the fitness of things, is not slavery, but the liberty which God himself enjoys, for He acts according to truth, according to the dictates of his own perfect nature; but to obey a lie is slavery, to act in opposition to the truth. This is the slavery to which the depraved human soul is subjected. The Saviour said, "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make

you

free.” The truth is peculiarly that by which the work of deliverance is accomplished, just because truth is the opposite of that error and falsehood by which man is enslaved. Whatever men believe is their master; if they believe truth, the control exercised over them is rational and salutary, but if they believe falsehood, then they are subjected to one or other of the varied forms of intellectual and spiritual bondage.

To illustrate the statements which we have just made, we might refer to the belief in judicial astrology and witchcraft, by which the minds of our ancestors were bound and oppressed. We referred in our first article to the general belief in these as indicative of man's craving for direct intercourse with the unseen world; we refer to it now as illustrative of the enslaving effect of error, and of the emancipating influence of truth. The belief that the heavenly bodies influenced the affairs of life, and that some human beings were invested with superhuman knowledge and power, in the exercise of which they were directed by Satan, held the minds of men in continual terror, and interfered fatally with right notions and feelings respecting the government of Divine providence; but this gloomy tyranny passed away, just as science advanced, and the man who would now manifest alarm at an eclipse of the sun, or the appearance of a comet, or the crowing of a cock, or the mutterings of an old woman, would be pitied and laughed at for his weakness, and ignorance, and folly. The idolater believes that the sun, and the moon, and the stars, or the mountains and rivers, or the figures of gold and silver, and wood and stone, which he has made with his own hands, are gods; and he is kept in perpetual bondage by the fear of offending them, and by attempts to obtain their favour when he supposes it has been lost. Let the truth be lodged in his mind that these are no gods—that his belief in their divinity is a delusion, and he is freed from the bondage in which he was held. The Papist believes that his priest has the power to forgive his sins, and that his sins must be confessed to the priest if they are to be forgiven ; he believes, that after death his soul will be subjected to the pain of purgatorial fire, and that, by the purchase of masses, he may speedily be delivered, and admitted to the full enjoyment of the felicity of heaven. This belief holds him in bondage—a bondage from which he can be freed only by his being convinced that the system which he has received as true is a system of falsehood and imposture.

It is not difficult to see the bearing of these illustrations on the subject under our consideration, namely, the application of the redemption of Christ Jesus to the soul of man. Man is the slave of sin. “ The cool, sagacious philosophic observer thinks so; the devout christian observer thinks so; the illuminated dying estimator thinks so.” Might we not add to these words of Foster, that God shows, by many distinct statements in the Scriptures, that He thinks so ? Man is alienated from God, and this alienation is a sad captivity. Scripture and experience tell us that man does not naturally love to think of God; that, instead of delighting in the perception and acknowledgment of his presence, in all places and at all times, he turns away from the unwelcome subject. Man struggles to get away from God; and,

instead of wishing to go to that world where there are to be obtained fuller manifestations of God, and more intimate communion with Him, man's thoughts cling to earth ; and if God is thought of at all, it is with feelings of fear, distrust, and aversion. Man is not only alienated from God, but strongly and universally in love with sin. “Suppose a man,” says Foster, 6 bound by some strong coercion in a servile connection with a malignant but specious lord who sets him to one occupation and another, with a mockery of making it delightful at first, but still turning it into painful drudgery

-showing him dainties, letting him taste, and then snatching them away, or mingling something bitter and nauseous, smiling and acting the villain, overruling and frustrating him in any design or attempt to escape, subjecting him to still greater grievances the longer he remains, and at length reducing him to utter degradation and contempt. This is but a faint simile for the slavery of sin.” When reason and conscience are dethroned, and when lust and passion reign, the soul is subjected to the most wretched bondage. Now how, in accordance with his intellectual and moral nature, is man to be freed? Is it not by his receiving truth, by his being convinced that sin, instead of being the good and pleasant thing which he thinks it is, is evil in its nature, and fatal in its consequences; that it never will, and never can, afford true and satisfying enjoyment? Is it not by his being convinced that God, whom he fears and hates, is the most excellent, and glorious, and lovely Being in the universe; one who loves his creatures, and desires their welfare ; one who yearns with unspeakable affection over the sons of men ; one who has sent his only-begotten Son to toil, and bleed, and die, that men might be redeemed ? This is precisely the scheme revealed in Scripture for the recovery of our fallen nature. God is made known to us as the greatest, and wisest, and most powerful, and most august, and most holy of beings; if we believe Him to be such, shall we not reverence and fear Him? He is revealed as infinitely munificent and compassionate, the Father and the Friend of mankind ; if we believe Him to be such, shall we not love Him? He has made many and pregnant promises, and is revealed as faithful and true ; if we believe this, shall we not put our trust in Him? Shall we not recognise His claims on our obedience ; and in the possession of His love, the contemplation of His character, and in the grateful and affectionate discharge of the duties He has assigned us, shall we not find suitable and lasting happiness ?

The objection that faith is in Scripture ascribed to the influence of the Holy Spirit, together with some general reflections, will form the subject of another article.

CAFFRARIAN CONVERTS.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN MAGAZINE.

MR EDITOR,-In the present disorganised and disastrous state of the Caffre Mission, it must be interesting to many of your readers, to receive information concerning the condition and safety of its converts. When the war broke out, there were about a hundred and twenty baptised converts, residing at the three stations of the society. About seventy sat down at the Lord's table, when the Sacrament of the Supper was, a little before the commencement of the war, celebrated at Chumie.. They are now scattered as sheep without a shepherd, in the kloofs of Caffreland, or throughout the different towns and districts of the colony. A few days ago, I had a letter from Mr Robert Hart of Glenavon, Somerset, who has ever taken a deep interest in the temporal and spiritual welfare of the coloured races in South Africa, and who has all along been the tried and steady friend of our mission. With his accustomed hospitality and kindness, he has made his house an asylum for some of the native converts, who have resorted to him for refuge; and has made enquiries concerning others of them who are residing in other places. I send the following list as sent by him to me; on its fidelity all may confidently rely.

Copy-MEMORANDUM of the Native Members of the United Presbyterian Church in Africa, and their present situation and employments, this 19th January, 1852, viz. :

Males.

Females,

No.

Place.

REMARKS.

e

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'alaried ag®nts conducting the religious services at Chumie in turn,

-Have not
joined the enemy, as
far as is known-of
whom late informa-
tion has been had.
Empld. by Civil Com.
With Father-in-law,
who is under Rev. Mr
(Gill, Miss. Lond. Soc.
Emplt. not known.
Busakwe killed at
Glenavon, — widow
and family in the
employ of R. Bowker
at that place.
Under R. Hart, sen.
Under MrJ. Pringle.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

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Service of Mr Hart.

Dase.

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Do.
Graham's Tn.
Glenavon.
K. Wm.'s Tn.

Do.

Do.
Uitenhage.

Do.
Cradock.
K. Wm's Tn.

Pepe, Schoolmaster.
Nazo.
Papu.

Employed.

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Vena.

Employed.

It is not known nor believed that any of the above have any connection with the enemy. There are a number more, though not members, who are steady, and employed on the frontier, in various directions, some of whom I know.

(Signed) RoBT. HART, Senior.

It is gratifying to learn from Mr Hart, that Notishi, so well known in this country, deservedly esteemed, and supported as a native teacher by the ladies of Greenock, is still able to prosecute her labours amid the native children, though her sphere of usefulness in the meantime is greatly circumscribed. In a letter I lately had from her, she says—“I still love my work of teaching, but I have rather few children. Twenty is the number. I am much obliged to the dear ladies who still think of me in these times of trouble.”

The four persons mentioned by Mr Hart as being at Chumie, are the elders of the church there, who retire into the bush during the day, and come out, usually, morning and evening, to conduct worship in the church, with those who, like themselves, are harbouring near the place, and who live mainly upon roots dug from the soil. I have had no information what is their number, though it is understood to be considerable. Notishi, in her letter, speaking of them, says,—“ Those that we left at Chumie are all well, with the exception of Coti, one of the teachers, who died of consumption. Yes, Sir, he is no more in this country of war and sorrows. He is, I hope, entered into the everlasting rest in heaven. Dukwana, Festiri, Tobi, and Nyosi, I am very glad to tell you that these four brethren still carry on the work of God, every Lord's-day, at Chumie. I often hear about them through a cousin of mine."

Of Pella whom Mr Hart mentions as being at Uitenhage, Mr Cumming, in a letter which I received by last mail from him, and who by this time is on his way home, relates the following incident :- “ Pella is working here (at Algoa Bay). The other day he found a ten pound note lying in the street. He brought it to me; and now it lies at the bank, waiting for a claimant. If no one appears, I suppose he will get it back. This is a pleasing instance of principle triumphing over circumstances." He might have added, of grace triumphing over the native covetousness of the Caffre heart.

I feel unwilling, Mr Editor, to occupy much of your precious space, though I have a great inclination to say some things in connection with the causes of the war and mission stations, which hitherto I have not seen fully and fairly stated, and I may yet ask room for them; but, in the meantime, I conclude by quoting a sentence or two from the letter of Notishi, in which she gives vent to her feelings of gratitude to our two missionaries. “ Kind Mr Niven,” says she, “whom I will never forget so long as I live, for his kindness in time of peace, or in time of war. He is always the same.

He and Mr Cumming have been fathers to us all, who came out with them from Caffreland to the colony. I was often very sorry to see the unkind treatment they got from their own countrymen, just because they were kind to us black people. They are well known to be our true friends. Sir, I cannot tell you

how sorry I am that our teachers have been obliged to leave us in the wilderness. I may say we are all like sheep—we cannot do without à shepherd. I am sorry for the churches that have been burned again in my country. If I but knew that we shall get Mr Niven back again, then I would rest with great hope amongst all these troubles. Two weeks ago we had Mr Cumming here on a visit, and were very glad to see him looking so well. Please remember me to Mr Niven."

Such are the expressions of affection of Notishi towards the missionaries; and in these I believe all will concur.

GAVIN STRUTHERS.

throughout the different towns and districts of the colony. A few days ago, I had a letter from Mr Robert Hart of Glenavon, Somerset, who has ever taken a deep interest in the temporal and spiritual welfare of the coloured races in South Africa, and who has all along been the tried and steady friend of our mission. With his accustomed hospitality and kindness, he has made his house an asylum for some of the native converts, who have resorted to him for refuge; and has made enquiries concerning others of them who are residing in other places. I send the following list as sent by him to me; on its fidelity all may confidently rely.

COPY-MEMORANDUM of the Native Members of the United Presbyterian Church in Africa, and their present situation and employments, this 19th January, 1852, viz. :

Males.

Females.

Place.

REMARKS.

Do.

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ducting the religious Dukwana, Elder. Wife Notase.

Chumie.

services at Chumie Festiri, do Do. Notase.

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in turn, -Have not Nyosi, d

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joined the enemy, as Tobi, do. Do. Jane.

Do.

far as is known-of whom late informa

| tion has been had. Pella, Schoolmaster. Do. Tiwe.

Uitenhage. Empld. by Cigil Com.

(With Father-in-law, Gosa, Scrip. Reader. Do. Noyeli. 1 2 | Fort Beaufort. who is under Rev.Mr

(Gill, Miss. Lond. Soc. Gasa, Schoolmaster. Do. Nopase. | 2 K. Wm.'s Tn. Emplt. not known.

IrBusakwe killed at

Glenavon, — widow Busakwe, Elder. Do. Mila.

Glenavon. { and family in the

employ of Ř. Bowker

( at that place. Notishi, Teacher. 1 Glenavon. | Under R. Hart, sen. Bacela. Wife Nokes.

Glenthorn. Under Mr J. Pringle. Dwesi. Do. Yeliwe.

Do.

Do. Subu.

Do.

Do.
Nomkini Gexa.

Do.
Nomkini.

Do.

Do.
Notesi.

Do.

Do.
Nomve.

Do.
Wife Sombo. Graham's Tn.
Notase.

Glenavon. Service of Mr Hart. Dase.

K. Wm.'s Tn.
Ngenise.

Do.
Pepe, Schoolmaster.

Do. Employed. Nazo.

Uitenhage.
Papu.

Wife Sarah.
Nosant.

Cradock.
Wife Noxina. 2 K. Wm's Tn. Employed.

Do.

ALS

Do.

Fuba.

Do.

Vena.

It is not known nor believed that any of the above have any connection with the enemy. There are a number more, though not members, who are steady, and employed on the frontier, in various directions, some of whom I know.

(Signed) RoBt. Hart, Senior.

It is gratifying to learn from Mr Hart, that Notishi, so well known in this country, deservedly esteemed, and supported as a native teacher by the ladies of Greenock, is still able to prosecute her labours amid the native

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