Prairie Time: A Blackland Portrait

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Texas A&M University Press, 2006 M04 4 - 251 páginas
In its most extensive prime, the Texas Blackland Prairie formed a twelve-million-acre grassy swath across the state from near San Antonio north to the Red River. Perhaps less than one tenth of one percent of this vast prairie remains—small patches tucked away here and there, once serving as hay meadows or sprouting from rock too stony to plow.

Matt White’s connections with both prairie plants and prairie people are evident in the stories of discovery and inspiration he tells as he tracks the ever dwindling parcels of tallgrass prairie in northeast Texas. In his search, he stumbles upon some unexpected fragments of virgin land, as well as some remarkable tales of both destruction and stewardship.

Helping us understand what a prairie is and how to appreciate its beauty and importance, White also increases our awareness of prairies, past and present, so that we might champion their survival in whatever small plots remain.

 

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Contenido

INGREDIENTS
13
GRASS
17
SOIL
33
FIRE AND RAIN
41
BUFFALO
57
DISCOVERING DREAM LAND
73
A TALE OF TWO PRAIRIES
77
THE GARDEN OF EDEN
93
LIVING HISTORY
143
JULIAN REVERCHONS PRAIRIE
153
WHERE THE PAVEMENT ENDS
165
A GIRL NAMED DAPHNE
173
MANIFEST DESTINY
183
THE BEELOUD GLADE
163
PRAIRIE HARVEST
171
THE TALLGRASS CAPITAL OF TEXAS
179

THE LOST PRAIRIES
107
DANCING CHICKENS
119
WIDELEAF FALSE ALOE
131
SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST
195
STALKING THE WILD PRAIRIE GRASS
205
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Acerca del autor (2006)

Matt White is the author of The Birds of Northeast Texas and is a regular nature columnist for the Mount Vernon Optic-Herald. He studies and grows prairie plants on his land near Campbell.

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