The Forest, Or, Rambles in the Woodland

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Betts & Anstice, opposite St. Paul's Church, 1832 - 208 páginas
 

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Página 148 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renowned, But such as at this day to Indians known In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillared shade High overarched, and echoing walks between; There oft the Indian herdsman shunning heat Shelters in cool, and tends his pasturing herds At loop-holes cut through thickest shade...
Página 148 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Página 68 - Ancient shipping, also, was frequently built of this timber. No doubt that the qualities of strength and durability, coupled with the advantage of readily yielding to the tool, were the reasons which induced the early builders to select it. It was also then, in many parts, the most plentiful and the largest timber that could be procured. But now, I believe, even in their native soils, they are scarcely more abundant than in England. The mountains of Lebanon have still a few cedars, and these are...
Página 139 - There is, indeed, hardly any part of the tree which is not serviceable to man, either as a necessary or a luxury. When the fruit is completely ripened, it will, by strong pressure, yield a delicious syrup, which serves for preserving dates and other fruits ; or the fruit may be made into jellies and tarts. The stalks of the bunches of dates, hard as they are in their natural state, as well as the kernels, are...
Página 79 - The cypress is reputed to live to a great age ; and, though the precise period has not been ascertained, the fact of its being planted over the graves of the dead, and carried in funeral processions, as an emblem of immortality, is a proof that its duration must be very considerable.
Página 75 - English archers stept forth one pace and let fly their arrows so wholly and so thick that it seemed snow ; when the Genoese felt the arrows...
Página 26 - But others have, whose eyes have been no better than yours," I replied. " However, something besides eyes seems needful to constitute an accurate observer of nature. It appears that the sap-vessels, just under the bark, which are in a soft, spungy state during the summer, harden in the winter, and become firm wood. In the next spring, fresh sap rises in another circle of vessels, pushing the bark outwards ; and, in its turn, changes into the close-grained proper wood of the tree. Thus the whole is...
Página 80 - The Greeks, I believe," said Mr. Longhurst, " buried the remains of their heroes in coffins of cypress ; and the chests in which Egyptian mummies are found are generally of this wood." THE DOUGLAS AND LAMBERT PINES. " I BELIEVE," continued Mr. Longhurst, " we have taken some notice of the most noted and useful of the pine family. I have, however, read of, but not seen, two other sorts, called the Douglas and the Lambert pines, which may as well be referred to ; as, I suppose, if they were natives...
Página 48 - I remarked, in addition, that the most noted of these transplanters was Louis XIV. who removed an entire forest, the Bois de Boulogne, from Versailles to its present site, a distance of more than seven miles. The great transplanting machine employed on these occasions remained at Versailles, till probably about the time of the French Revolution." One of the young ladies observed, that she had found difficulty in removing a few lilacs and roses only to a border across the path, and that many of them...
Página 136 - Birman empire, the teak forests are unrivalled ; and they rise so far over the jungle or brushwood, by which tropical forests are usually rendered impenetrable, that they seem almost as if one forest were raised on gigantic poles over the top of another. The teak has not the broad strength of the oak, the cedar, and some other trees ; but there is a grace in its form which they do not possess.

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