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climb the wall like men of warre, and they military merits, that the slightest disposition shall march every one in his wayes, and they towards marauding meets immediate punishshall not break their ranks. 8. Neither shall ment. Independently of all moral obligation, one thrust another, they shall walk every one the army which is most orderly in a friendly in his path : and when they fall upon the country, has always proved most formidable sword, they shall not be wounded. 9. They to an armed enemy. shall run to and fro in the citie; they shall run upon the wall, they shall climbe up upon the houses : they shall enter in at the windows

Note XVI. like a thief. 10. The earth shall quake before them, the heavens shall tremble, the sunne l'ainglorious fugitire!–P. 607. and the moon shall be dark, and the starres The French conducted this memorable shall withdraw their shining.'

retreat with much of the fanfarronade proper In verse 20th also, which announces the

to their country, by which they attempt to retreat of the northern army, described in impose upon others, and perhaps on themsuch dreadful colours, into a land barren selves, a belief that they are triumphing in and desolate,' and the dishonour with which the very moment of their discomfiture. On God afflicted them for having 'magnified the 30th March, 1811, their rear-guard was themselves to do great things, there are overtaken near Pega by the British cavalry. particulars not inapplicable to the retreat of Being well posted, and conceiving themselves Massena ;-Divine Providence having, in all safe from infantry (who were indeed many ages, attached disgrace as the natural punish- miles in the rear), and from artillery, they ment of cruelty and presumption.

indulged themselves in parading their bands

of music, and actually performed 'God save Note XV.

the King'. Their minstrelsy was, however,

deranged by the undesired accompaniment The rudest sentinel, in Britain born,

of the

British horse-artillery, on whose part in With horror paused to view the havocdone,

the concert they had not calculated. The Gave his poor crust to feed some wretch forsurprise was sudden, and the rout complete; lorn. P. 607.

for the artillery and cavalry did execution

upon them for about four miles, pursuing at Even the unexampled gallantry of the the gallop as often as they got beyond the British army in the campaign of 1810-11, range of the guns. although they never fought but to conquer, will do them less honour in history than their humanity, attentive to soften to the utmost

NOTE XVII. of their power the horrors which war, in its mildest aspect, must always inflict upon the

Vainly thy squadrons hide Assuava's defenceless inhabitants of the country in

plain, which it is waged, and which, on this occasion,

And front the flying thunders as they roar, were tenfold" augmented by the barbarous With frantic charge and ten fold odds, in crucities of the French. Soup-kitchens were

vain!-P. 607. established by subscription among the officers, In the severe action of Fuentes d'Honoro, wherever the troops were quartered for any upon May 5, 1811, the grand mass of the length of time. Thecommissaries contributed French cavalry attacked the right of the the heads, feet, &c. of the cattle slaughtered British position, covered by two guns of for the soldiery: rice, vegetables, and bread, the horse-artillery, and two squadrons of where it could be had, were purchased by cavalry. After suffering considerably from the officers. Fifty or sixty starving peasants the fire of the guns, which annoyed them in were daily fed at one of these regimental every attempt at formation, the enemy turned establishments, and carried home the relics their wrath entirely towards them, distributed to their famished households. The emaciated brandy among their troopers, and advanced wretches, who could not crawl from weakness, to carry the field-pieces with the desperation were speedily employed in pruning their vines. of drunken fury: They werein nowise:checked While pursuing Massena, the soldiers evinced by the heavy loss which they sustained in the same spirit of humanity, and in many this daring attempt, but closed, and fairly instances, when reduced themselves to short mingled with the British cavalry, to whom allowance, from having out-marched their they bore the proportion of ten to one. Capsupplies, they shared their pittance with the tain Ramsay (let me be permitted to name starving inhabitants, who had ventured back a gallant countryman), who commanded the to view the ruins of their habitations, burnt hy two guns, dismissed them at the gallop, and the retreating enemy, and to bury the bodies of putting himself at the head of the mounted their relations whom they had butchered. Is artillerymen, ordered them to fall upon the it possible to know such facts without feeling French, sabre in hand. This very unexpected a sort of confidence, that those who so well conversion of artillerymen into dragoons, deserve victory are most likely to attain it contributed greatly to the defeat of the enemy -It is not the least of Lord'Wellington's | already disconcerted by the reception they

had met from the two British squadrons; undertake all the hazard of obloquy which and the appearance of some small reinforce might have been founded upon any misments, notwithstanding the immense dispro- carriage in the highly important experiment portion of force, put them to absolute rout. of training the Portuguese troops to an imA colonel or major of their cavalry, and proved state of discipline. In exposing his many prisoners (almost all intoxicated), re inilitary reputation to the censure of imprumained in our possession. Those who con dence from the most moderate, and all manner sider for a moment the difference of the of unutterable calumnies from the ignorant services, and how much an artilleryman is and malignant, he placed at stake the dearest necessarily and naturally led to identify his pledge which a military man had to offer, and own safety and utility with abiding by the nothing but the deepest conviction of the tremendous implement of war, to the exercise high and essential importance attached to of which he is chiefly, if not exclusively, success can be supposed an adequate motive. trained, will know how to estimate the How great the chance of miscarriage was presence of mind which commanded so bold

supposed, may be estimated from the general a maneuvre, and the steadiness and con opinion of officers of unquestioned talents fidence with which it was executed.

and experience, possessed of every opportunity of information ; how completely the

experiment'has succeeded, and how much the Note XVIII.

spirit and patriotism of our ancient allies

had been underrated, is evident, not only And what avails thee that, for Cameron from those victories in which they have borne slain,

a distinguished share, but from the liberal Wild from his plaided ranks the yell was and highly honourable manner in which these given :-P. 607.

opinions have been retracted. The success

of this plan, with all its important conseThe gallant Colonel Cameron was wounded

quences, we owe to the indefatigable exertions inortally during the desperate contest in the of Field-Marshal Beresford. streets of the village called Fuentes d'Honoro. He fell at the head of his native Highlanders, the 71st and 79th, who raised a dreadful

Note XX. shriek of grief and ragę. They charged, with irresistible fury, the finest body of

-a race renown'd of old, French grenadiers ever seen, being a part

I'hosewar-cryoft has waked the battle-swell. who led the French, a man remarkable for --the conquering shout of Græme. stature and symmetry, was killed on the

-P. 609. spot. The Frenchman who stepped out of his rank to take aim at Colonel Cameron

This stanza alludes to the various achievewas also bayoneted, pierced with a thousand

ments of the warlike family of Græme, or wounds, and almost torn to pieces by the

Grahame. They are said, by tradition, to furious Highlanders, who, under the command

have descended from the Scottish chief, under of Colonel Cadogan, bore the enemy out of

whose command his countrymen stormed the the contested ground at the point of the

wall built by the Emperor Severus between bayonet. Massena pays my countrymen

the Firths of Forth and Clyde, the fragments a singular compliment in his account of the

of which are still popularly called Græme's attack and defence of this village, in which

Dyke. Sir John the Græme, 'the hardy, he says the British lost many officers, and wight, and wise, ' is well known as the friend Scotch.

of Sir William Wallace. Alderne, Kilsythe, and Tibbermuir, were scenes of the victories

of the heroic Marquis of Montrose. The Note XIX.

pass of Killiecrankie is famous for the action O who shall grudge him Albuera's bays, between King William's forces and the HighIVho brought a race regenerate to the field,

landers in 1689, Roused them to emulate their fathers' •Where glad Dundee in faint huzzas expired.' praise,

It is seldom that one line can number so Temper'd their headlong rage, their courage steel'd,

many heroes, and yet more rare when it can And raised fair Lusitania's fallen shield.

appeal to the glory of a living descendant in -P. 608.

support of its ancient renown.

The allusions to the private history and Nothing during the war of Portugal seems, character of General Grahame may be to a distinct observer, more deserving of illustrated by referring to the eloquent and praise, than the self-devotion of Field-Mar- affecting speech of Mr. Sheridan, upon the shal Beresford, who was contented to vote of thanks to the Victor of Barosa.

the field of Waterloo:

A POEM.

'Though Valois braved young Edward's gentle hand,
And Albert rush'd on Henry's way-worn band,
With Europe's chosen sons, in arms renown'd,
Yet not on Vere's bold archers long they look 'd,
Nor Audley's squires nor Mowbray's yeomen brook'd, -
They saw their standard fall, and left their monarch bound.'

AKEXSIDE.

TO

HER GRACE

THE DUCHESS OF WELLINGTON,

PRINCESS OF WATERLOO,

THE FOLLOWING VERSES
ARE MOST RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

BY

THE AUTHOR.

It may be some apology for the imperfections of this poem, that it was composed hastily, and during a short tour upon the Continent, when the Author's labours were liable to frequent interruption; but its best apology is, that it was written for the purpose of assisting the Waterloo Subscription.

ABBOTSFORD, 1815.

1.

Thy wood, dark Soignies, holds us Fair Brussels, thou art far behind,

now, Though, lingering on the morning | Where the tall beeches' glossy bough wind,

For many a league around, We yet may hear the hour With birch and darksome oak between, Peal'd over orchard and canal, Spreads deep and far a pathless screen With voice prolong'd and measured Of tangled forest ground. fall,

Stems planted close by stems defy From proud Saint Michael's Theadventurous foot-the curious eye tower;

For access sceks in vain ;

* Let the wind howl through hawthorn Sit fast-dost fear? The moon shines bush!

clear; This night we must away ;

Fleet goes my barb-keep hold ! The steed is wight, the spur is bright; Fear'st thou?''Ono !' she faintly said; I cannot stay till day.

* But why so stern and cold ? * Busk, busk, and boune ! thou mount'st What yonder rings? what yonder behind

sings? Upon my black barb steed:

Why shrieks the owlet grey ?' O'er stock and stile, a hundred miles, “'Tis death-bells'clang, 'tis funeral We haste to bridal bed.'

song,

The body to the clay. • To-night-to-night a hundred miles ? O dearest William, stay!

"With song and clang, at morrow's The bell strikes twelve-dark, dismal dawn, hour!

Ye may inter the dead : O wait, my love, till day!'

To-night I ride, with my young bride,

To deck our bridal bed. Look here, look here—the moon shines clear

• Come with thy choir, thou coffin'd Full fast I ween we ride;

guest, Mount and away! for ere the day

To swell our nuptial song! We reach our bridal bed.

Come, priest, to bless our marriage

feast ! • The blackbarbsnorts, the bridlerings;

Come all, come all along!' Haste, busk, and boune, and seat Ceased clang and song; down sunk thee!

the bier; The feast is made, the chamber spread,

The shrouded corpse arose : The bridal guests await thee.'

And, hurry! hurry! all the train

The thundering steed pursues. Strong love prevailid. She busks, she bounes,

And, forward! forward ! on they go; She mounts the barb behind,

High snorts the straining steed; And round her darling William's waist

Thick pants the rider's labouring Her lily arms she twined.

breath, And, hurry! hurry! off they rode,

As headlong on they speed. As fast as fast might be;

"O William, why this savage haste? Spurn'd from the courser's thundering

And where thy bridal bed ?' heels

''Tis distant far, low, damp, and chill, The flashing pebbles flee.

And narrow, trustless maid.' And on the right, and on the left, • No room for me?' 'Enough for both;

Ere they could snatch a view, Speed, speed, my barb, thy course!' Fast, fast each mountain, mead, and O'er thundering bridge, through boilplain,

ing surge And cot, and castle flew.

He drove the furious horse.

the field of Waterloo:

A POEM.

'Though Valois braved young Edward's gentle hand,
And Albert rush'd on Henry's way-worn band,
With Europe's chosen sons, in arins renown'd,
Yet not on Vere's bold archers long they look'd,
Nor Audley's squires nor Mowbray's yeomen brook'1,--
They saw their standard fall, and left their monarch bound.'

ArexSIDE.

10

HER GRACE
THE DUCHESS OF WELLINGTON,

PRINCESS OF WATERLO(),

THE FOLLOWING VERSES

ARE MOST RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

THE AUTHOR.

It may be some apology for the imperfections of this poem, that it was composed hastily, and during a short tour upon the Continent, when the Author's labours were liable to frequent interruption; but its best apology is, that it was written for the purpose of assisting the Waterloo Subscription.

ABBOTSFORD, 1815.

I.

Thy wood, dark Soignies, holds us Fair Brussels, thou art far behind,

now, Though, lingering on the morning · Where the tall becches' glossy bough wind,

For many a league around, We yet may hear the hour With birch and darksome oak between, Peald over orchard and canal, Spreads deep and far a pathless screen With voice prolong'd and measured ; Of tangled forest ground. fall,

Stems planted close by stems defy From proud Saint Michael's Theadventurous foot—the curious eye tower;

For access seeks in vain ;

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