Illustrations of the History of Great Britain: An Historical Viel of the Manners and Customs, Dresses, Literature, Arts, Commerce, and Government of Great Britain; from the Time of the Saxons, Down to the Eighteenth Century, Volumen1

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Constable & Company, 1828
 

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Página xcvi - A genealogical History of the Kings of England, and Monarchs of Great Britain, from the...
Página 96 - THE body of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was given for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life ! Take and eat this in remembrance that Christ died for thee ; and feed on him in thy heart by faith with thanksgiving.
Página cxviii - Among the rest was a large collection of original letters, written during the reigns of Henry VI. Edward IV. Richard III. and Henry VII. by such of the Paston family...
Página xcvi - Divi Britannici, being a Remark upon the Lives of all the Kings of this Isle, from the year of the world 2855, unto the year of grace 1660, fol.
Página cxii - The History of Great Britain, connected with the Chronology of Europe; with notes, &c. containing anecdotes of the times, lives of the learned, and specimens of their works, vol. I. from Caesar's invasion to the deposition and death of Richard II.
Página 158 - ... and friends. These little courts, however, communicated with others of a larger jurisdiction, and those with others of a still greater power ; ascending gradually from the lowest to the supreme courts, which were respectively constituted to correct the errors of the inferior...
Página xcvii - Regal Heraldry ; the Armorial Insignia of the Kings and Queens of England, from Coeval Authorities.
Página 12 - To this last, when they resolve upon a battle, they commonly devote the spoil. If they prove victorious, they offer up all the cattle taken, and set apart the rest of the plunder in a place appointed for that purpose: and it is common in many provinces, to see these monuments of offerings piled up in consecrated places. Nay, it rarely happens that any one shows so great a disregard of religion, as either to conceal the plunder, or pillage the public oblations; and the severest punishments are inflicted...
Página 25 - The ancient Icelandic mythology calls him " the author of every thing that existeth; the eternal, the ancient, the living and awful Being, the searcher into concealed things, the Being that never changeth.